About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 40
MSNBCW 16
CNN 6
KQED (PBS) 4
KGO (ABC) 3
KPIX (CBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
MSNBC 2
CSPAN2 1
FBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 103
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)
's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
with palestinian authority leaders and going to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. i wouldn't be surprised based on what i'm hearing if there is no deal yet, she might come back to jerusalem, engage in some shuttle diplomacy, akin to henry kissinger. if israel moves into gaza with massive amounts of grounds forces, tanks, heavy artillery, armored personnel carriers, it will be a disaster. you know this area, you're there. you know how densely populated it is. it's going to be a serious problem and what the u.s. and egyptians, most of the international community, they want make sure israelis don't do it. but prime minister benjamin netanyahu say to keep the rockets and missiles come there coming in, they might have to do it. >> the death toll now in gaza, palestinian officials say is 137 people killed so far in the seven, now eight days going into the conflict. official death toll for israel is five. one soldier was killed today, first soldier killed by a rocket fires from gaza. joined by arwa damon and been ben wedeman. the blasts bring home the difficulties so many civilians face. people don't
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two central issues from the two perspectives. the head of the hamas today held a press conference in which he highlighted hamas position, and that is simple in their eyes, israel must stop all hostilities against the leadership and assassinating and killing key palestinian figures and call on the international community to
, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas and an intensification of israeli attacks in gaza witnessed by what happened to you guys, what you sa
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
provided money to the egyptian government for their successful mediating. >> thank you very much. our cairo correspondent joins us on . we have conflicting reports. hamas as a truce has been negotiated. israel says not yet. what's going on? >> it is very unclear. this afternoon, they said the ceasefire was going to be tonight and then hamas in cairo says there is supposed to be a press conference right now as we speak. and, soon after, they say that there might be a ceasefire agreement, but they are not sure. we know that, as we speak, they're surrounded by artillery so there's no sound on the ground. >> it is not necessarily close. of their close to reaching a deal, what will be the terms? >> there are four 0.7. the first is that israel promises they will stop the killing of hamas officials. the second is hamas, their point, they will not fire rockets and more into israel. then as some kind of the easing of gaza. it has not really been decided on that point. and egypt wants to be a part of the agreement. >> . for the update. >> turkey says there close to formally asking nato for patriot mi
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
of the possibility of a cease-fire. hamas officials say, in fact, it would have been announced hours ago in cairo. clearly, that's not happening. there's no sign of a cease-fire. in fact, certainly, if you look -- if we go back over the last few hours, five or six hours, it's been an evening of fairly intense fire, not only incoming israeli air strikes, but just a little while ago, we saw two rockets being launched also from this area behind me. and certainly by the looks of those rockets, and we're getting very good at recognizing them, some of them do appear to be these so-called 5 rockets, which have a fairly long range, rockets fired in the direction of tel aviv and jerusalem. also today, one of those rockets falling to the south near the settlement block in the west bank. and another building, an israeli building a town outside tel aviv on the road to jerusalem. so we've seen a fairly intense evening, certainly, of violence here, incoming, as well as outgoing. and all this talk about a ceasefire and discussions in cairo and elsewhere don't seem to be amounting to much at this time. now, toda
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the is are dotted, t richardson cros are crossed. until there's a deal, there's no deal, as they like to say, the diplomatic community. >> we also know the president, president obama, has called and talked to the preside
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
are the greatest defender of the arab cause, which is the palestinian cause. and it works. go to cairo, to the shops of cairo, and you will see photographs of ahmadinejad, an iranian leader. why? because he stands up for the palestinians. that's the game the iranians play, and my guess is the more horrible the pictures are out of gaza the more there is a sense of this massive drift of power between israel and the palestinians. the more iran will be seen as one of the few countries that is willing to really stand up and speak against the west and, you know, they have, as you know, very colorful rhetoric, but that's all geared towards this regional gain where they're almost outwitting the arab against the palestinians. >> let me veer off to israel for a moment. benjamin netanyahu is up for reelection soon. how much do you think what's happening now, this rousing with gaza, does or doesn't have anything to do with him? >> we have to hope this has nothing to do with that because this is a very serious business. not only is he taking his own country into a military operation, he is risking
in this process. i will carry this message to cairo tomorrow. i will also be consulting with president abas in ramala. let me also say to echo the prime minister, i'm very pleased that the iron dome defense system is performing so well. our partnership in support of this system represents america's enduring commitment to the safety and security of the israeli people and to israel's right to defend itself. but no defense is perfect. and our hearts break for the loss of every civilian israeli and palestinian and for all those who have been wounded or who are living in fear and danger. i know today was a difficult day. and i offer my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those who were lost and injured. in the end there is no substitute for security and for a just and lasting peace. and the current crisis certainly focuses us on the urgency of this broader goal. so in the days ahead the united states will work with our partners here in israel and across the region toward an outcome that bolsters security for the people of israel, improves conditions for the people of gaza and moves toward a
from cairo next. from the journalists of fox news this is "the fox report." americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp, an organization serving the needs of americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they help cover some of the expenses medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands in o
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
to cairo where she's meeting with the egyptian president mursi. mrs. clinton making it clear that she is not interested in a quick fix in gaza. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability, and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> cnn reporters flanking the middle east today to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of the crisis in gaza and in jerusalem and in israel. ben wedeman is in gaza city. frederick pleitgen is in ashkelon city. we begin with sara sidner at the scene of that bus explosion that happened just a little while ago in tel aviv. sara first of all describe for me how that looks right now. >> what has happened right now is the cleanup is under way. there are still tape up around the scene. we're very close to the defense department building, and the military headquarters, this is a bus that the number 61 bus, we know that it exploded, glass all around the bus was blown out. however the blast was not strong enough to knock out the ability for the bus to operate. and so we saw literally the b
. >> nbc's stephanie gosk is in tel aviv, ayman mohyeldin in gaza, jim maceda in cairo. let's ask jim maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demand
brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ye
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: police and protesters clashed in cairo's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
with palestinian leaders in gaza before heading to cairo. today, the seventh day of hostilities, israeli aircraft hit a hamas center as more rockets rain down on israel. susan mcginnis is following it all. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. the white house says secretary clinton will not meet with hamas while she's in the region. for now, the head of the u.n. is trying to get both sides to hold their fire without success. mosques in gaza issued the prayer for morning prayers today, even as bombs and missiles rained down around them. the israeli military says it hit about 100 terror sites overnight, including the islamic national bank in gaza city that israel says is used to fund terror operations. hamas militants have launched more than a thousand rockets into israel during this week-long battle. palestinian officials say 38 more people were killed monday, including women and children. israel says it's trying to minimize civilian casualties. >> the problem is the terrorists are hiding these rocket launchers deep inside civilian areas and mosques and schools and people's homes, firing
and hamas. the head of hamas is now making a statement in cairo. want to play that for you. >> translator: god took their hand off gaza and can build them to commit themselves to the conditions of the resistance. therefore, if we understand, this simplicity, we can understand as people of the media to tell the brave message of our people to the entire world, because we want the entire world to understand our people and our cause. and through you, we can explain the faces, the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy, because they have failed in their attempt and their attempts back fired against them. they wanted to destroy the infrastructure of the resistance in hamas. today, they claim they have done so, and they have not. this is -- they are bankrupt. i don't deny they have done so much, we could count how many buildings they have destroyed. and how many offices of the media they have destroyed and how many children they have kill ed. and how many journalists and how many photographers they have killed, just like you. we can count how many offices and how many buildings they have destroy
. an israeli official reportedly just landed in cairo, where egypt is trying to broke are a cease-fire. as israel signals it is open to negotiation, it is also preparing for the possibility of a ground war. we have team coverage. we have a reporter on the ground and a reporter traveling with president obottom akeeping a close eye on the middle-east. leyland? >> reporter: shannon, this is a country on the brink of war, just over my right shoulder is the gas station, where many citizens soldier some of the 30,000 reservivist, called up, stopping for everything from oreos to water to do rito's to pick up before they man their tank, maneuvering in the black of this, right behind me, before possibly heading into gazzasm more than a dozen palestinian killed in airstrikes inside the gaza strip. many of them are civilian, some children. here, we have had at least a dozen injured. this is quite literally the tip of the israeli spear. these are citizen shoaleddiers, a lot of them engineers or accountants, drafted into service here. they are getting their tanks ready, all along the gaza bord
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
>> good morning, everyone, it's sunday, november 25th, i'm alisyn camerota. in cairo muslim brotherhood encourages protests. anti-morsi protesters taking over tahrir square. >> dave: and shredder, and police files used as confetti at the macy's day parade. how can it happen? is our security now at risk? >> illinois has the worst budget deficit in the nation and why is the state spending millions of taxpayer dollars on table for prisoners. >> and eco friendly zip lines, maybe they want them to watch "fox & friends" in prison, have you ever thought of that. >> dave: amen, there's some viewers, baby. >> clayton: "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ . >> alisyn:. >> alisyn: good morning, everybody, thanks for joining us bright and early on this sunday morning, we have quite a show for you, including the ongoing debate that dave briggs launched yesterday about yoga pants and we invite you to weigh in this morning. >> clayton: you're still leading this fight and championing this fight. >> alisyn: he's made it a platform. >> dave: i may run for the white house based on yoga pants.
east. will that happen? we're going back live to gaza. we're going to cairo, we're going to israel. all of that right here in "the situation room." nd? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomo's cars, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add plant protein, like gluten iams never adds gluten. iams adds 50% more animal protein, [ dog 2 ] look at me! i'm a lean, mean flying machine [ dog 1 ] i am too! woo
in cairo and they agreed on a cease-fire, and the israeli government surprised us. and then -- i hope this will be an eye-opener for mr. netanyahu. i hope that he will get one lesson. the lesson is that security will only be achieved through peace, through the two-step solution. security will not be achieved through bombing and wars and war-mongering. we need to reach this conclusion and we need now to support everything offered by the egyptians in order to get a comprehensive cease-fire. that's what we're working on. he's fully engaged with all palestinian actions, including hamas, and is fully on board to achieve a blanket comprehensive cease-fire because that's what will help all concerned, palestinians, israelis, and americans. >> i know one of the issues the israelis are demanding in the israeli cabinet, i'm told is meeting right now, even as we speak, the so-called international security cabinet, the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, one of the things they want to make sure is that even if there's a cease-fire, the shelling into israel, some of these rockets and missiles don't
of the palestinian authority in the west bank, president mahmood abbas and then she will fly to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. she won't meet with hamas which the u.s. government regards as a terrorist organization. netanyahu met last hour with secretary of state ban ki-moon. the two met with reporters only moments ago. >> unfortunately, mr. secretary, hamas and islamic jihad and the other terrorist groups do not share your concern about our civilian casualties or about civilian casualties at all. >> that was the israeli prime minister meeting with the u.s. secretary-general ban ki-moon. earlier today israel put an all-out ground assault of gaza on hold,age i'm quoting, to give limited time for a diplomatic solution. egypt sees an end to the gaza conflict, that's see. president morsi says, the travesty of the israeli aggression on ga did will end in a few hours ap christiane amanpour is here and watching what's going on. the diplomacy is intense right now but it's by no means a done deal. >> it's not a done deal but by all the signals we're getting, it looks like both sides feel they are j
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator for the time being or might have unprecedented power throughout this period of two months, but after that, these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament. >> brown: but tens of thousands of anti-morsi protesters rallied in tahrir square, the heart of last year's popular revolution that led to end of the regime of hosni mubarak. they threw rocks at riot police, who retaliated by firing tear gas canisters to disperse the crowds. >> this is just a new era of dictatorship in
's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in place until a new parliament is formed. so technically, he's going to be the most powerful man essentially he can do whatever he wants, without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, john, that has a lot of his opponents describing this as an undemocratic power grab. >> and do these changes affect
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)